DAY TWO AT VANCOUVER FASHION WEEK AUTUMN/WINTER 2017/18

Vancouver Fashion Week kicked off day two with a series of designers that are new to the VFW catwalk.

KRISTEN LEY – CANADA

Sculptural leather forms with an avant-garde twist were sent down Kristen Ley’s catwalk. Having studied fashion in Vancouver, Ley executes her vision through creative design and a nod to contemporary art. Her most statement-making pieces include, form-fitting moulded torso pieces, a shimmering asymmetrical dress with manipulated tulle overlay and a balloon skirt made from metres of a swirling teal sea.

TRISTEN MICKELSON – UNITED STATES

This young designer (seventeen) constructs his empowering designs by wedding a street style vibe with luxury materials. Leather and dark hues prevail and the most noticeable shape is Tristen Mickelson’s relaxed, oversized trousers paired with cleverly cut shirts and large overcoats.

MOSKAL – CANADA

Stephanie Moscall-Varey, the face behind the womenswear brand MOSKAL, was one to watch on the runway as she has been recognised for her work in Canada, the United States and in Italy. Her techniques are influenced by natural forms and fabrics and her delicate tones and fluidly feminine shapes make her pieces instantly identifiable. Carefully worked netting, sheer flowing skirts and a modern colour palette of lilac, cornflower and tangerine made the show pop.

HANJUN JO – UNITED KINGDOM

Trained in the United Kingdom and producing in South Korea, Hangjun Jo’s autumn/winter collection was K-fashion meets Savile Row. Inspired by 1920’s tennis, numerous wools and fabrics were layered in a mesh of easy-on-the-eye patterns and soft blocks of colour. The muted hues, soft  fabrics, rough edges and asymmetric shapes were lifted to new styling heights via linear makeup and eye-popping lashes.

KAKOPIEROS – AUSTRALIA
Naming Anne Frank as the inspiration behind her collection, Kakopieros embeds dark and chaotic elements in her politically-charged work. Rubber and latex are used to reflect the world’s woes, including the refugee and environmental crises. Expletives are branded across the bondage-esque collection splashed with neon and horror in equal measures. The erratic undertones are enhanced with the addition of disjointed Barbie appendages dangling from models’ ears, tucked into stockings and strewn across the neck. Club kid-wigs, fishnets and constricting facial jewellery topped off a collection that will leave you thinking about human trafficking, women’s rights, ‘fake news’ and those on the margins of human decency.

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